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Letter Writing Techniques – Good News Vs Bad News Letters

There are different strategies and techniques to be discussed when writing good-news and bad-news letters. In good-news letters a writer is conveying good news to the receiver. The first paragraph (introduction) provides the good-news topic (reason for the letter). The second paragraph (discussion) provides the details of the good-news and the third paragraph (conclusion) calls for action.

Bad-news letters use the indirect approach and opens with a neutral idea while providing facts and supporting evidence. The second paragraph presents the reason for the bad news letter. The third paragraph ends with a neutral close. Tact and politeness is required when writing a letter of bad news. A writer of a letter of bad news must pay attention to tone and structure throughout the letter to avoid future problems. Writers must prevent themselves from offending the reader.

All writing is a form of persuasion. A writer tries to persuade their reader to understand his, or her point of view. Attention to wording is essential in a bad-news business letter to prevent breaking the code of ethics. An example for a reason for a bad-news letter is:

A company I work for has been advised to downsize labor cost by any means possible. The only choice I have is to terminate all temporary positions within the company. This decision requires that I write bad news letters to each of the temporary employees, terminating them and explaining to each one the reason for termination. I must take care to use tact and politeness throughout the letter while making it clear that their job performance was excellent and had no bearing on my company decision. When writing to the employee, I should offer a severance pay and to write a letter of recommendation to help the employee with job search. Additionally, medical benefits should be extended for a short time after termination. Additionally, letting the employee know that with his, or her given qualifications and proven abilities, I am confident that he or she will find another position in the near future. End on a calm and upward happy note.

Letter Writing Techniques – Good News Vs Bad News Letters

There are different strategies and techniques to be discussed when writing good-news and bad-news letters. In good-news letters a writer is conveying good news to the receiver. The first paragraph (introduction) provides the good-news topic (reason for the letter). The second paragraph (discussion) provides the details of the good-news and the third paragraph (conclusion) calls for action.

Bad-news letters use the indirect approach and opens with a neutral idea while providing facts and supporting evidence. The second paragraph presents the reason for the bad news letter. The third paragraph ends with a neutral close. Tact and politeness is required when writing a letter of bad news. A writer of a letter of bad news must pay attention to tone and structure throughout the letter to avoid future problems. Writers must prevent themselves from offending the reader.

All writing is a form of persuasion. A writer tries to persuade their reader to understand his, or her point of view. Attention to wording is essential in a bad-news business letter to prevent breaking the code of ethics. An example for a reason for a bad-news letter is:

A company I work for has been advised to downsize labor cost by any means possible. The only choice I have is to terminate all temporary positions within the company. This decision requires that I write bad news letters to each of the temporary employees, terminating them and explaining to each one the reason for termination. I must take care to use tact and politeness throughout the letter while making it clear that their job performance was excellent and had no bearing on my company decision. When writing to the employee, I should offer a severance pay and to write a letter of recommendation to help the employee with job search. Additionally, medical benefits should be extended for a short time after termination. Additionally, letting the employee know that with his, or her given qualifications and proven abilities, I am confident that he or she will find another position in the near future. End on a calm and upward happy note.

Simple Ways to Earn-Essay Writing Jobs

Do have a bit of spare time everyday and wondering how it can be used productively? Have you written small articles for the local magazines in your school/college days and would like to build on that? Here’s a simple way to supplement your current income by just spending just a couple of hours a day: Essay Writing.

Essay writing is a very good idea if you have reasonable English skills, that can be put to good use in your leisure time. Its not time consuming, and actually slowly grows on you, in fact. Why not display your language prowess by writing articles and essays?

Ever since the advent of the internet, the website business has mushroomed. Who provides the content for all these billions of websites? Each time a new website pops up, someone has to fill it up with content, and it might as well be you, and make some money in the process. Many people use essay writing as their supplementary careers, some of them to great success.

Essay writing has been popularized by many article database websites, such as eZine itself, whose growth has been exponential since its launch. Writing essays can also be stimulating to the brain, garnering knowledge from various sources. There are other benefits as well. Writing is a great way to actually “reach out and touch someone”. It is quite gratifying to have others read and compliment your skills, and have people from all over the world looking to you for their needs.

Did you also realize that writing is one of the few areas that still isn’t automated! I think we can take pride in that fact. Pick up a pen, er, i mean keyboard, gear up your Grey cells and put those creative juices to use. Who knows, with a bit of luck, you might be the next Francis Bacon!


Source by Jake Schofield

IELTS Tips and Tricks – Mastering the Writing Task

Everyone’s biggest problem with Writing Task is finishing both tasks on time. What no one tells you is that if you don’t finish either one, you lost a whole band point. This never has to happen to you!

The key to making sure that you report and essay qualify as finished is that they have a clear Conclusion paragraph. That paragraph can be one sentence long, if necessary. And the best news of all is, you have already written that sentence!

At the end of the Introduction (paragraph 1) of the Writing Task 1 report, you have written a summary of the information. In the same position – at the end of the first paragraph – in Writing Task 2, you have written your Thesis Statement. Simply be repeating both of those sentences at the beginning of a Conclusion paragraph, you have made your writing qualify as finished – even if there is more you wanted to write. And you don’t lose a whole band point needlessly.

Here’s what you do:

1)Make sure you do write a good summary in Writing Task 1 and a good Thesis Statement in Writing Task 2. (Your report and essay won’t work without them anyway.)

2)Watch your watch! No one is going to keep you on track as far as elapsed time is concerned. It’s up to you to monitor your own progress.

3)In Writing Task 1, if 18 minutes have passed and you’re still writing Body Paragraph sentences, finish the sentence you’re writing, quickly. Then, start a new paragraph (and make sure it looks like a new paragraph), and begin it with the words, “In conclusion,…” Then rewrite the summary. If you can, change a word or two (but not the meaning). If not, just write it exactly the way you did at the end of the Introduction.

4)In Writing Task 2, if 38 minutes have passed and you’re still writing Body Paragraph sentences, finish the sentence you’re writing, quickly. Then, start a new paragraph (and make sure it looks like a new paragraph), and begin it with the words, “In conclusion,…” Then rewrite the Thesis Statement. (This needs to be done in any case. It is an essential part of the essay.)

5)Ideally, in Writing Task 2, you should write the Restatement in reverse order of the Thesis Statement. For example, if it is an opinion essay, and you wrote your opinion and three reasons in the Thesis Statement, write the three reasons first, and then the opinion, in the Restatement. Again, if you have time and can, change a word or two (but not the meaning). If not, just write it exactly the way you did at the end of the Introduction.

6)Make sure you finish these “In conclusion,…” sentences on time. The task ends at exactly 60 minutes.

Obviously, this will not save you any lost points if all you have is a few sentences and your essay is far too short in the first place. But if you have written most of the essay, and followed the format, it’s essential that you not lost a whole band point just because it isn’t finished. So make it look finished!

Law School Essay Exams – What to Memorize

Law students ask, “Isn’t law school about more than just memorizing? The answer is clear: Absolutely!

But must law students memorize? The answer is just as clear: Absolutely!

Some professors erroneously tell students that “law school is not about memorization.” I say “erroneously” because law school IS about memorization… and so much more. But for the moment, let’s just focus on grades – and for most courses, that means focusing on exams.

In order to write a high-scoring essay exam answer, a student needs to employ many skills and strategies. Cogent presentation, high level analysis, sophisticated legal reasoning… yes, these are critical capabilities when it comes to earning “A” grades.

But one cannot earn an “A”… or a “B”… without being able to spot the issues that the professor expects to see analyzed. In order to find issues, one must “know” the law. In the deeper sense, to “know” the law is to understand its background, variations, nuances, subtleties, and so on. And, yes, that sense of knowing is very important. But in the fundamental sense, to “know” the law (in the context of exam-answering) is to be able to write a rule statement without actively thinking; to “know it by heart.”

Before walking in to a Torts final exam, a student committed to earning the best grade he or she is capable of earning ought to have learned “by heart” at least each of the following:

  • As to each tort, a statement of every “rule” – meaning a sentence or more that includes every element that must be proven to result in a determination that the tort has been committed.

  • As to each affirmative defense, a statement of every “rule” – meaning a sentence or more that includes every element that must be proven to result in a determination that the defense is viable.

  • A definition of every element, including “tests” to determine if that element can be proven.

A schematic template for constructing an essay is, essentially, included within these three categories. Here’s a partial example:

  • To prove negligence, a plaintiff must prove that the defendant owed a duty to all foreseeable plaintiffs, that the defendant breached this duty by not acting in accord with the standard of care, and that this breach caused the injury to plaintiff.

  • Duty. A plaintiff must prove that the defendant owed a duty to all foreseeable plaintiffs, that the defendant breached this duty by not acting in accord with the standard of care, and that this breach caused the injury to plaintiff.

  • Standard of care. The standard of care is the degree of prudence and caution required of an individual who is under a duty of care.

  • Breach of duty. A breach issue can be looked at from (at least) two different angles…

  • Balancing test. Liability turns on whether the burden of adequate precautions is less than the probability of harm multiplied by the gravity of the resulting injury. B
  • Negligence per se. The three essential criteria include: that plaintiff is a member of the class intended to be protected by the statute, that the type of injury which occurred is the type the statute was enacted to guard against, and the violation was not excused.

But a student need not memorize these 214 words. This works:

  • Negligence – duty, breach, standard of care, cause, damage.

  • Breach – balance, per se. (…and so on…)

Should a student “memorize by rote”? Ideally, no. It’s unnecessary if a student has adequately prepared for each class, produced a personal course summary (outline), and answered dozens of short-answer (and longer) practice questions. The repetitive use of the fundamental rules to resolve tough problems embeds the elements into the memory for most. But not all. That’s why memory tools are important to many law students. (More about that later.)

Another helpful item to add to the bullet-point list above (what to memorize) is this: a list of every issue studied. This provides an excellent checklist for the student to quickly run through during the pre-writing stage of composing the essay answer. How much rote memorization does this entail? Not much. (For an example of a Criminal Law checklist, go to this link, then scroll down to Criminal Law, Checklist.)

Students must remember that the “memorization” part – the learning by heart part – is only a small part of what must be done to score high on exams. But if a student is not able to run through the elements of each intentional tort (for example) quickly, without pausing to try to recall specifics, issues will be missed. Don’t let that happen!